Steaming tray of…

Right on, Dan. (“Brooks: The high cost of preventing a free lunch,” April 18). Above all, we have to take care of the children. By turning these unpaid lunch bills over to a collection agency, the credit rating of these children later in life will be negatively affected — just because they needed to eat. It really is bullshit.

Richard Brodowy

facebook.com/missoulaindependent


Taste the tax

I’m a conservative, but in this situation it seems the best thing to do financially, morally, and in every way, is just provide free lunch and get the revenue for it through taxation.

Leslie Herbert

facebook.com/missoulaindependent


A nickel here...

We raise money for everything in Missoula, why not let us contribute to the feeding of our children?

Hollyk Ondrasek

facebook.com/missoulaindependent


Little help?

People need financial counseling for sure, but what a wonderful thing to save people from homelessness! (“How a fundraising campaign spared Missoula mobile homes from the auction block,” April 19). Heroes, for setting it up and donating! Let’s start donations for next year.

Rose Wilkinson

facebook.com/missoulaindependent


All the money’s gone

There isn’t any amount of “financial counseling” or “budgeting” that will help these folks. The money simply isn’t there to “budget.” The majority of these folks struggle for mere survival. It’s a daily struggle to keep the heat going and food on their table — there simply isn’t anything left over to “save” or “budget.” To take their homes from them is reprehensible.

Sherri Leonard

facebook.com/missoulaindependent


Please, do go on

I’m sorry, but am I reading that correctly?! People have their homes taken away for owing $180?! Honestly, I’d best just stop my comment right here.

Louise McMillin

facebook.com/missoulaindependent


Wrong way

What is the cost to keep all those new empty buildings going? (“UM launches a ‘strategy for distinction,’” April 19). [The strategy is] mostly cuts. Keep cutting the arts and humanities, and see if you can compete with online STEM colleges. And millennials are not as hooked on the sportsball, it seems. People in the system warned about this, but exponential growth was all that was planned for.

Jon Thomas

facebook.com/missoulaindependent


Josh for commish

I write in support of Josh Slotnick, the Democratic candidate for the Missoula County Board of Commissioners. Josh has been my mentor since I worked at his family farm in 2011, then as a teaching assistant and employee at the PEAS Farm. He continues to mentor my work as a beginning farmer, and professionally in Missoula’s nonprofit sector. Josh models how to build community for long-term sustainable growth. I experience first-hand his ability to listen respectfully to divergent viewpoints, resulting in constructive and forward-thinking action.

Josh is well practiced at weaving individuals’ needs into the fabric of the high quality of life we experience in Missoula. When we worked together at the PEAS farm, Josh taught me how reaching across sectors in the community could help build healthy large-scale systems. What stands out from that time is that the basis for building a healthy community meant slowing down enough to truly listen. Josh embodies this lesson, learning the needs of those coming from different economic and social backgrounds. He embodies collaboration every day as he shares his time and skills to make change in support of long-lasting community health.

Ellie Costello

Missoula


Collaborative Connie

In Missoula, we’re fortunate to have a wealth of community leaders. The downside is that sometimes we are forced to make tough choices, as in the current race for House District 91. What sets Connie Keogh apart is that she knows how to work on the other side of the aisle. The reality is that Republicans will likely control the Legislature, and committees will be stacked in conservatives’ favor. Democrats will need to work skillfully to make progress on issues we care about as a community. While Connie has lived in Missoula for several years, she grew up on a small ranch in eastern Montana where her family raised cattle for three generations. That’s a background that conservatives can understand, and maybe there’s enough common ground to find solutions on issues that are important to both small towns and larger cities. I know we can count on Connie Keogh to stand up for us on the House floor. But I also know we can count on her to work every day in committee to make progress where possible. That’s why Connie Keogh has my support for HD 91.

Denver Henderson

Missoula

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