Hauck’s return

This guy is deplorable. I worked for UM following on the heels of the rape downplay exposure (“Does Missoula really want a return to Hauck?” Nov. 28). Are we sure we want to invite that former view of UM? Particularly since UM has been struggling ever since that time to make any sort of return to its former enrollment projections. I’m sure there are a whole bunch of football fans who might not care either way. Sad message to our community’s women, who have been let down in the past by our UM athletics organization.

Joseph Grady

facebook.com/missoulaindependent


Too much baggage

Uh, no. Let’s look to the future. Not the past. I’m pretty sure that there are other coaches out there who would do great and don’t have the baggage and shitty personality that Hauck brings to the table.

Vini Stafford

facebook.com/missoulaindependent


It’s draining students

UM has a decent sexual harassment/assault information program now. However, I wouldn’t blame any incoming freshmen females for choosing another school. So watch our enrollment erode even further down the drain.

Jane Tremper East

facebook.com/missoulaindependent


Give Hauck a chance

I agree there was a downside to his tenure here. But the fans didn’t seem to care as long as he was winning. I do believe in redemption, though. The climate is much different in 2017-18 than it was in the 2000s. If he is hired, I think he’s smart enough to “know the score.” I don’t see him stonewalling any student reporters again. That came to an end when Dennison intervened.

Alan Johnson

facebook.com/missoulaindependent


“Act like”

I say bring him back and let the adult football players act like law-abiding citizens. Raise your children right in the first place.

Jim Andersen

facebook.com/missoulaindependent


Trust betrayed

I have been closely associated with the University of Montana for over 40 years: as a student with three UM degrees, as an employer who hired dozens of UM graduates, and for the past seven years as a teacher in the Honors College, philosophy department and ecological restoration program. The university holds a special place in my heart, and I have defended it throughout these years despite many decisions with which I strongly disagreed. However, my trust in and loyalty to the university were betrayed this past week by the decision to hire Bobby Hauck as the football coach. I believe many faculty, staff and alumni share this feeling of betrayal. Bobby Hauck, more than any other person, was responsible for the culture of impunity with respect to sexual harassment and assault by athletes that led to a federal investigation, the firing of multiple high-level university employees, the precipitous decline in student enrollment and the widespread perception that the university was unsafe for women. That he has now been rehired clearly reveals the priorities of this university. The gladiator football culture that values winning no matter the cost is clearly more important than the educational mission of the university. On the day he was hired, the university announced the termination of 30 lecturers [Editor’s note: those termination notices were later rescinded] dedicated to the education of students. It is unclear how many more faculty and staff will be terminated in the near future. The recent completion of the obscenely luxurious Washington Grizzly Champions Center merely reconfirms where the university’s priorities lie. There have been heartening reports over the past year of a rapid cultural shift in the treatment of women. Clearly, this long-awaited and much-needed cultural turning point has not yet reached the University of Montana. I ask that Commissioner Clay Christian refuse to approve Bobby Hauck’s contract, and that our new president, Seth Bodnar, clearly state that educational excellence and a safe learning environment for all students are the guiding values of this university. Only then can the long, hard task of restoring confidence begin once again.

Patrick Burke

Missoula


Oppose I-183

As someone who has lived, gone to school, and worked in Montana for the last 18 years, there are many things that I love about this state. Chief among those are a strong sense of community and how we care for our neighbors. The kindness we show to strangers is known throughout the country—just ask anyone who has visited our beautiful state. It is because of this kindness that I would like to ask you, one Montanan to another, to please oppose Initiative 183.

This initiative has been proposed for the sole purpose of keeping transgender Montanans from being able to use our public spaces, such as libraries, parks, even our schools. Transgender individuals do not only exist in the vacuum of politics, they are our friends, family, neighbors and coworkers. Trans Montanans live and work alongside us every day, and I-183 directly denies them the freedom, dignity and privacy that the rest of us take for granted.

Not only is I-183 an act of discrimination that does not align with Montana values, it will be a huge financial burden on our local governments, schools and taxpayers. The writers of the initiative estimate that $545,699 in general funds will be spent in the first four years alone, with no indication of what the long-term costs will be. This money could be spent much more wisely than on blatant discrimination.

I hope that you will join me in protecting the freedom, dignity and privacy of all Montanans by opposing I-183. We are too strong, too smart and too kind to allow such a discriminatory and hateful initiative to become law under the Big Sky.

Sadie Viergutz

Missoula

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